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What we're eating right now :: caramelised garlic tart

It's easy to grow good garlic in Tasmania.  The winter provides plenty of chilly nights resulting in those prized fat purple heads.   Yesterday I sowed next year's garlic crop.  About sixty cloves that should, by Christmas all going well, turn into sixty fat heads of purple garlic.  



 
Although we're not self sufficient in much food wise, roosters and garlic we never have to buy.  We always manage to grow enough to eat for most of the year, along with saving enough cloves to sow for the following season.

It's about this time of year however, when the stored garlic starts to sprout.  The cloves go soft and start to dry out and they don't make very good eating.   I have to regularly pick through the basket and cook up, or sow any with green shoots emerging.  The stores are still on track though to have enough to last until spring, then we can start picking the green flower stalks or scapes that will have grown from the cloves sown this week.
This tart is based on the recipe from Yotam Ottelnghi's book Plenty. I've edited it slightly in the spirit of thriftiness, and using three whole heads of garlic, it's a delicious way to use up those sprouting cloves.


Caramelised Garlic Tart

1 sheet of puff pastry - although I made my own rough puff based on this recipe

3 whole heads of garlic, cloves separated and peeled

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 tablespoons balsamic

1 teaspoon brown sugar

1/2 cup of water

100g goats cheese

2 eggs

1/2 cup creme fraiche

1/2 cup of pure cream

A few sprigs of thyme

Line a 20cm loose bottom tart tin with puff pastry and blind bake in a moderate oven for 10-15 minutes or until pastry is golden.  Remove from oven and set aside, but leave the oven on.

Meanwhile, put the cloves in a small saucepan and cover with plenty of water.  Bring to a boil and blanch the garlic cloves for about 3 minutes, then drain and dry off cloves. Dry the saucepan and pop the cloves back in with the olive oil and heat over medium heat for a few minutes until garlic starts to colour.

Add balsamic and water, increase heat to high then once boiling, reduce to a simmer.  Cook at a gentle simmer for around 10 - 15 minutes, then add thyme, sugar and a pinch of salt and continue to simmer until most of the liquid has evaporated and the cloves are coated in a thick syrup.  Remove from heat and allow to cool a little.

To assemble the tart, crumble goats cheese evenly over the base of the tart shell. Then spoon cloves and syrup over the cheese.

Make a custard by beating the eggs, creme fraiche and cream together adding a little salt and pepper in a small jug and pour over tart filling, making sure the custard fills in any gaps.  You still want to see garlic and cheese poking up through the custard.

Bake tart in the oven for about 35 - 40 minutes or until top is golden and custard is firm.

Allow to cool a little, and serve warm.

18 comments:

  1. I'm so pleased you posted the recipe for this. I saw your shot on IG and started thinking about some sprouting red onions I have stored away. I think this could work with them.
    Carol

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    1. Oh yes! Red onion would be delicious too!

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  2. I love this Michelle...yum! I am at the same stage with some of my previous garlic crop and this sounds like a perfect way to use it. Is this pastry suitable for meat pies? I am looking for a no fail, easy, go-to pie pastry recipe! Great weather for pies and tarts isn't it?

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    1. Thanks Jane! Yes this pastry is perfect for meat pies! And I agree, it is certainly tart and pie weather! I saved half of this pastry to make a pot pie with some left over beef curry. Perfect!

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  3. ooh that looks amazing. I'm planning to plant my first garlic tomorrow... never done it before, but just love the idea of growing my own! Thanks for the inspiration...

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  4. The looks so delicious Michelle! Planting out the garlic was the one job i didn't manage to get to before Oscar was born. I had great success last year and it's something we use just about everyday so I had hoped to plant heaps this season.

    rachel xo


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  5. This looks delicious. I pinned it so I can find it later. Thanks a bunch!

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  6. This looks delicious! Pinning! xx m.

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  7. YUM! This looks delightful -- although my mum won't do goats cheese (she says she can smell the sheep from her farm childhood off the cheese, which I find hilarious) what would you recommend as a good alternative? Something that won't completely change the essence of the tart?

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    1. Hello Una, that's is funny your mum thinks goats cheese smells like sheep! I think you could use mascarpone or cream cheese, or even a mild cow feta for a substitute.

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  8. Looks scrumptious Michelle. and thank you for the link to the rough puff pastry, I have been thinking about making my own for a while now and this looks like a perfect recipe to try.
    x

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    1. thanks Zara - you should give rough puff a go - pretty easy after a few practices!
      x

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  9. Thank you so much for this, I am having friends over next weekend and this is just what I will cook and will mention your wonderful blog.

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    1. Oh Thanks Julie - I hope you enjoy!
      xx

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  10. Yum - that looks and sounds delicious Michelle! Love the contrast of the purple and white in that garlic. xx

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    1. Thanks Naomi, garlic is very pretty, I like taking pictures of it!
      x

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  11. Is it wrong that I have just finished a bowl of delicious porridge and am now drooling over your tart?
    This will be the perfect weekend brunch to greet in the Winter months.

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