Geeveston Fanny Skillet Cake




 

Come autumn in the valley, the light softens as the leaves turn golden, the smell of bonfires fill the air and best of all, roadside stalls sell new season apples.   Ramshackle sheds, with charming handwritten signs spruiking their wares, signal to passing drivers to pull over.    Bags of apples are piled high, usually fujis, galas, goldies and grannies.  Just leave your money in the honesty box before heading on your merry way, not before tearing open the bag and passing around the apples to munch as you drive on to your destination.    

I must say of all the apples you can buy around the valley, it's the Geeveston Fanny that's our favourite.   Not only is it a front runner in the best name ever stakes, but it's actually a really delicious apple.  Lovely red skin with a super white flesh and a perfect balance of sweet and tangy.  My kids eat them by the bucket loads.

I couldn't help but buy a few kilos when I saw the word Fannys on the chalkboard at a shed near Castle Forbes Bay.   And now blessed, with a box full of them, a simple apple cake was called for.   Baked in a cast iron skillet, my new favourite baking tin of choice. I seem to have got myself quite a collection these days.



Geeveston Fanny Skillet Cake
60g caster sugar

150g plain flour

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

60g butter, melted then cooled slightly

1 egg, beaten

2 tablespoons milk

2 or 3 Geeveston fanny apples cored, and cut into ½ cm thick slices
 (any apples will do really)
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
2 teaspoons sugar (extra)


Preheat oven to 180 C.
Coat the bottom of a 25cm cast-iron skillet with olive oil.
Sprinkle the skillet with 1 tablespoons of the sugar.

Whisk remaining sugar, flour, salt and baking powder together in a medium bowl.
In a small jug, mix together the melted butter, beaten egg and milk.

Make a well in the centre of the flour mixture, then add the butter-milk-egg mixture. Gently fold until just combined. Do not over mix.
Spread the batter into the prepared skillet, smoothing the top with the back of a spoon.

Starting at the edge of the cake, arrange the apple slices in a circular pattern.
Mix together the cinnamon and extra 2 teaspoons of sugar. 
Sprinkle evenly over the apple slices.


Bake for approximately 25 minutes, or until a skewer inserted in the middle comes out clean.

Allow the cake to cool for at least 10 minutes. Don’t forget to be mindful of the handle, which will be hot!  I'm happy to serve this cake straight from the skillet.  But if you wish to be fancy, remove the cake by loosening the sides with a spatula, turn over onto a plate then flip back onto a cooling rack.


18 comments:

  1. Hmmm, I wonder whether our backyard tree just might be a fanny. They do look mighty familiar and I haven't been able to identify it to my satisfaction. I might just start calling it that anyway, for the joy of saying it! The cake looks wonderful. This is my all time favourite apple cake recipe: http://www.abc.net.au/local/recipes/2008/08/21/2342504.htm if you have a few fannies left over!

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    1. I would call your tree a geeveston fanny for sure! Thanks for the cake link, it looks delicious!

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  2. I cannot wait until our apple trees bear fruit! I'm not sure how far off it'll be but it's exciting waiting :)

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    1. How exciting! It's such a thrill picking the first apple of a tree you planted.xx

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  3. Holy moly! Looks so delicious!
    Will definitely be giving it a try!!!
    Thank you for sharing lovely lady.
    Xo

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  4. Love the skillet idea and the cake looks scrummy too.

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    1. Skillets are so great to cook in! I love them. x

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  5. Just look at that fruit! And totally the best name ever for an apple! :)

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    1. Peasgood nonsuch is a good name too, but Geeveston Fanny is a winner!

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  6. they look like snow white apples - gorgeous! flick x

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  7. We have just a few apples on our little trees - and a couple of them will be making their way onto this cake for sure. A great way to share them around :)

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  8. This looks awesome. I hate to be a PITA but is the recipe for the camp fire peanut brittle lurking around.Thank you!!

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  9. Beautiful... I wish I had easy access to amazing honesty boxes like that!! Your cake looks beautiful.

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  10. oh my! I need to try this skillet cake, like, ASAP! Thanks for sharing, Michelle :)

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  11. Oh my - that sounds utterly divine and delicious.

    Nina x

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